OBSERVATORIES: We look to the sky and face our roots.

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Stairway to the moon (Selenography)

Ink and Shellac Ink on Paper
86cm x 122cm

The first photography of the moon was made in the Observatory of Paris. On the way to the dome you step on a blue carpet. A stairway to the stars.

 

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Proposal

„Life can only be understood backwards;
but it must be lived forwards.“
Søren Kierkegaard

The following drawings are showing an excerpt of the series “We look to the sky and face our roots”. Each pen and ink drawing shows a detail of the history or highlights an architectural originality of the particular observatory:

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Observatoire de Paris

Ink on Paper
86cm x 122cm

 

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Le méridien de Paris de Paris

Ink and Shellac Ink on Paper
86cm x 122cm

Louis XIV founded the Observatory of Paris in 1667. It was built on the meridian of Paris. The 4 corners of the drawing are shown the symbols of the researchers who were involved in the construction of the observatory.

Adrien Auzout and Jean Picard invented the crosshairs.
Jaques Buot measured the inclination of the Saturn ring.
Bernard Frénicle de Bessy researched in magical squares.
Jean Picard was the founder of geodesy.

 

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Radcliffe Observatory, Oxford University, England

Architecturally inspired by the Tower of Winds in Athens.

Ink on Paper
86cm x 122cm

Radcliffe Observatory was architecturally inspired by the Tower of the Winds in Athens. The tower of the winds in Athens was built by the mathematician, architect and Astronomer Andronikos built by Kyrrhestes.

 

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Observatory Athens, Greece

Homage to Aristachus of Samos.

Ink and Shellac Ink on Paper
86cm x 122cm

Aristarchus of Samos (320-250 BC). He was the first Greek astronomer we known, who convinced the heliocentric world-view.

 

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Michelson-Haus, Observatory Potsdam, Germany

Ink on Paper
86cm x 122cm

 

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Great Refractor, Potsdam, Germany

Ink and Shellac Ink on Paper
122cm x 86cm

Double stars can be detected with the large refractor.

 

 

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Urania Sternwarte, Zurich, Switzerland

Ink and Shellac Ink on Paper
86cm x 122cm

The inquiring minds and business sense shook hands by the planning and implementation of the public observatory Urania in Zurich. For ensuring the economic base, the observatory tower is architectonically connected with a commercial building.

 

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Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope,

Mount Graham International Observatory, Arizona, USA

Ink on Paper
86cm x 122cm

 

„THE STARS OF MOUNT GRAHAM“
The Crown Dancers of the San Carlos Apaches in Arizona had to transfer their land to the stars. On their sacred land was build the “ Mount Graham International Observatory” the University of Arizona in partnership with the Vatican. The Apaches are not allowed to visit their sacred land anymore.

 

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Grande Lunette

Observatory Castle Meudon with refracting telescope, France

Ink and Shellac Ink on Paper
122cm x 86cm

 

In the dome of the former castle Meudon the third largest lens telescope of the world was installed. It is called Grande Lunette (big glasses).

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The Paris Society in 1849 and the Speed of Light

Ink and Shellac Ink on Paper
Polyptych: 244cm x 258cm

The French physicist Hippolyte Fizeau measured the speed of light in 1849 from a little town called Suresnes to Montmartre Paris. The experiment was repeated and confirmed by the Physicist Alfred Cornu. He measured the speed of light from the Observatory in Paris to the Montmartre.



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We Look to the Sky and Face Our Roots

Fabra observatory on the rooted mountain, Barcelona, Spain

Ink on Paper
86cm x 122cm

 

 

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First the Rotation, than the Ellipse

Copernicus and Keppler

Ink and Shellac Ink on Paper
61cm x 86cm

Nicolaus Copernicus brought the turning point in astronomy. The Copernican worldview saw the sun in Center of our universe. Johannes Keppler added that the planets circle elliptically around the Sun.

 

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How is it time to be understood? Do we understand time
when we look into space? In space there is an answer to the future,
but not the future as the answer. The information,
created out of the universe with the most modern technology,
are already past until they are recognizable for the human in the
present. So when we look into the present, we look into the
past. And from the past, we can concludethe future.

 I wanted to search for past traces of the spots in which the future has been researched.

 

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